Final Constellation Observation

This observation is your last of four during this quarter. Hopefully, you will choose to do this observation when the moon is not up, or at least when it is either a crescent or slightly less than first quarter. The moon's light tends to obscure the light for dimmer stars. As you look at the stars for the first time, even with the aid of the star chart, you will discover that identifying constellations is pretty hard at first. MORE IMPORTANTLY, do this observation as close to the end of the term as possible. November is typically the cloudiest month of the year, so look at the forecasts and get a clear night to do this as close to November 4 as possible.

Please fill in the requested information listed below and respond to me via e-mail within the first two weeks of the course:

Your Name:

E-mail Address (Required):


Date:
Time of observation. Start: Finish:
Location (be specific):
Sky Conditions:
Type of visual aid (if used): final

As you look up at the night sky, perhaps for the last time with any sense of purpose, I would like you to use the seasonal star chart which I have provided for you, or get one from the Internet Star Charts and try to identify as many constellations as possible. Please make a list of the constellations you find in the sky. You can print this page and take it with you when you are outside, and complete the form in returning your observation over the computer web. Have fun, stay warm, and see as much as possible :) If you are observing during a cold night, remember your hot coffee and mittens. Oh, by the way, I am hopeful that you will demonstrate some honesty in these assignments by actually observing for more than a few minutes, or writing later that it was cloudy during every evening you attempted to observe.

1) Please make a list of the constellations Found:

2) Did you find any of the circumpolar constellations, and if so, which ones did you observe:


3) Constellations you tried to find but could not:




4) Other things you saw during this observation:

5) What did not notice about the constellations that was different from what you saw 8 weeks ago?


6) Joys and frustrations you felt while outside:


When you have completed this final constellation observation, click the submit button to send in your observation time and place as well as your responses to the questions. You may then move ahead to directly to SETI, or back to Cosmology, or to the Syllabus.


       

 


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